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“I want to control my own newsfeed.”

I think this is a statement that nearly everyone will agree with. But here’s what happens. When someone adds me to a group, event, or party, content is forced into my newsfeed that I didn’t consent to see.

Adding people to groups without their consent doesn’t respect the relationship of giving each social media user the right to control their own newsfeed. There are not any brands that teach this practice (that I know of). What happens is that people do it, others see it as a quick way to grow a group, and model the behavior. And then it spreads, and a brand develops a reputation of “everyone does that spammy thing” and perpetuates the reputation of both the brand, and this industry overall.

And what happens, is that you then end up with 1 – a group or party with very low overall engagement (and therefore sales), 2 – people in your group or party who aren’t even seeing your content, or 3 – people who mark your content as spam because they didn’t opt-in to see it and don’t know how it got into their newsfeed.

Encouraging anyone to mass-add is not a relationship-based strategy, ever. It’s spammy and self-serving, and can dramatically hurt you in the long run. How do you get around it? Exceptional hostess coaching that encourages hostesses to invite to the group or party. A great content strategy that keeps your community engaged on a relational level. Truly believing the statement “I respect you more as a friend than as a sale, and that you can control your own newsfeed.”

Social media and relationship-based marketing is playing the long game. Short term spammy tactics may gain you a big group, but you’ll lose in the long run when you have a dead group and can’t figure out how to revive them.

Know better, do better.

#EmpowerSocial